Tag Archives: debian

Too good to #0009

In this episode:

  • urlwatch for new daily Ubuntu Server ISO
  • systemd-run ephemeral timers as replacement for at
  • Mozillateam Firefox on Debian
  • systemd service: ExecStartPre as root
  • gdm3 autosuspend/shutdown behaviour

urlwatch for new daily Ubuntu Server ISO

Somewhat desparate because at the time of starting this post, the (pre-beta, non-LTS, not blaming anyone) server image in question was badly broken.

---
name: Ubuntu Server Daily ISO
url: https://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-server/daily-live/current/SHA256SUMS
filter:
  - grep: .*-live-server-amd64.iso
---

systemd-run ephemeral timers as replacement for at

Goes great with “hardened” systems that deny use of at(1).

Run a command 60 seconds from now, via the user’s private systemd (after logout only if session lingering is enabled).

systemd-run --user --on-active=60s -- logger --tag foo "Hello world"

Run a command 2 minutes from now, privileged or as a specific user via the global systemd:

sudo systemd-run --uid="${LOGNAME}" --on-active=2m -- touch /tmp/hello

Insights

systemctl --user list-timers
journalctl --user -u 'run-*.timer'
sudo systemctl list-timers
sudo journalctl -u 'run-*.timer'

Mozillateam Firefox on Debian

$ sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mozillateam-ppa.list <<Here
deb https://ppa.launchpadcontent.net/mozillateam/ppa/ubuntu jammy main
deb-src https://ppa.launchpadcontent.net/mozillateam/ppa/ubuntu jammy main
Here
$ sudo tee /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/mozillateam.asc < <(curl 'https://keyserver.ubuntu.com/pks/lookup?op=get&search=0x0ab215679c571d1c8325275b9bdb3d89ce49ec21')

systemd service: ExecStartPre as root

[Service]
...
User=nonroot
Group=nonroot
ExecStartPre=+install -d /var/lib/theservice -o nonroot -g nonroot
ExecStart=/usr/sbin/theservice

See systemd.service, “special executable prefixes”.


gdm3 autosuspend/shutdown behaviour

Debian:

$ sudo apt-get install dbus-x11
$ sudo chsh -s /bin/bash Debian-gdm
$ sudo -i -u Debian-gdm
$ gsettings get org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.power sleep-inactive-ac-type
'suspend'
$ dbus-launch gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.power sleep-inactive-ac-type nothing
$ gsettings get org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.power sleep-inactive-ac-type
$ exit
$ sudo chsh -s /bin/false Debian-gdm

Arch/Garuda:

$ sudo chsh -s /bin/bash gdm
$ gsettings get org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.power sleep-inactive-ac-type
'suspend'
$ dbus-launch gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.power sleep-inactive-ac-type nothing
$ gsettings get org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.power sleep-inactive-ac-type
$ exit
$ sudo chsh -s /usr/bin/nologin gdm

Too good to #0007

Disable the dynamic motd on Ubuntu and everywhere else

This is without messing around in /etc/pam.d or doing things that may be reverted by future updates. Remember to systemctl enable disable-dynamic-motd.timer.

# /etc/systemd/system/disable-dynamic-motd.timer
[Unit]
Description=Disable all the dynamic-motd scriptlets (timer)

[Timer]
OnBootSec=10
OnActiveSec=3600

[Install]
WantedBy=timers.target
# /etc/systemd/system/disable-dynamic-motd.service
[Unit]
Description=Disable all the dynamic-motd scriptlets (service)

[Service]
Type=oneshot
ExecStart=sh -c 'chmod -v -x /etc/update-motd.d/*'

Disable verbose logging on realmd.service

Problem on AD-member Linux client, realmd logs thousands of redundant messages:

Feb 01 11:11:34 kvm-28ca realmd[22302]: client using service: :1.1042
Feb 01 11:11:34 kvm-28ca realmd[22302]: holding daemon: :1.1042
Feb 01 11:11:34 kvm-28ca realmd[22302]: client gone away: :1.1042
Feb 01 11:11:34 kvm-28ca realmd[22302]: released daemon: :1.1042

Solution, disable debug logging in the systemd unit by introducing this drop-in:

# /etc/systemd/system/realmd.service.d/override.conf
[Service]
LogLevelMax=info

Sorting Debian package versions

dpkg –compare-versions is not exactly a secret, but I’ve wrapped a script around it to visualize and better wrap my head around non-straightforward naming schemes:

$ cat test.txt
2.1
2.2~pre01
1.0
2022-01.1~pre03
2.1-bugfix-foo
2.1~bugfix-foo
2.2
2022-01~foo~bar
2022-01
1.0
0
3
2022-01~foo
$ ./dpkg-sort-versions < test.txt
Sorted from lowest (oldest) to highest (latest):
0
1.0
1.0
2.1~bugfix-foo
2.1
2.1-bugfix-foo
2.2~pre01
2.2
3
2022-01~foo~bar
2022-01~foo
2022-01
2022-01.1~pre03

Script is here.

Too good to #0006

“Sudo on demand” from TGT0003 considered more useful for downgrading privileges on the fly

#!/usr/bin/env bash

want_user=letsencrypt
am_user="$(id -un)"
printf "Running as: %s\n" "${am_user}"
if [[ "${want_user}" != "${am_user}" ]]
then
        printf "Re-executing with sudo.\n"
        exec sudo -u "${want_user}" "${0}"
fi
...

JSON export of all installed packages on Debian/Ubuntu

#!/bin/bash

function dpkg_json(){
    printf "{\n"
    format='"${Package}": { "Version": "${Version}", "Architecture": "${Architecture}", "Status": "${db:Status-Abbrev}" },\n'
    dpkg-query --show --showformat="${format}" | sed '$s/,$//'
    printf "}\n"
}

dpkg_json | jq .

Urlwatch for a new version of a package in the Ubuntu package pool

---
name: "Ubuntu Curtin package (waiting for apt-key fix)"
url: http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/pool/main/c/curtin/
filter:
  - xpath: //table//td[2]
  - html2text
  - grep: ^curtin.*\.deb$
---

Too good to #0005

Prioritizing own NTP servers for systemd-timesyncd

# cat /etc/systemd/timesyncd.conf.d/timesyncd-corporate.conf 
[Time]
NTP=ntp1.example.com ntp2.example.com ntp.ubuntu.com

Test if text is empty (even if it does contain a linebreak)

Good job by: https://unix.stackexchange.com/q/386499/2028

if ! grep -q '[^[:space:]]' "${file}"; then echo "Text is empty"; fi

Watch for changes in the Gnome registry

(To reproduce manual changes, for configuration management.)

dconf watch / # (Sorry, thats all)

Trigger Debian/Ubuntu unattended-upgrade

(For testing configuration changes)

rm /var/lib/apt/periodic/*
systemctl start apt-daily.service 
systemctl start apt-daily-upgrade.service 

And remember:

tail -f /var/log/unattended-upgrades/*log

Too good to #0003

Linux uptime in seconds, once and for all

awk '{printf "%i\n", $1}' /proc/uptime

“Sudo on demand”, re-exec shell script with sudo if not running as root

#!/usr/bin/env bash
printf "Running as: %s\n" "$(id -un)"
[[ ${EUID} -ne 0 ]] && printf "Re-executing with sudo.\n" && exec sudo "${0}"

See also TGT0006, this is just as useful for downgrading privileges on the fly.


“When was the last time apt-get on that Debian/Ubuntu machine installed package upgrades?”

  • Reliably answering this is a lot harder than it looks, subject of countless discussions and really does need to parse /var/log/apt/history.log, which is painful.
  • The script below maintains a file /var/log/apt/lastupgrade with the last upgrade’s time stamp, for further processing.
  • Does NOT track invocations of apt-get upgrade that did not lead to package upgrades.
  • Does NOT look behind logfile rotations, which should not be a problem because it’s closely hooked to dpkg.

/usr/sbin/apt-lastupgrade:

#!/bin/bash

while IFS=: read -r key value
do
	if [[ "${key}" == 'Start-Date' ]]
	then
		upgraded=0
	elif [[ "${key}" == 'Upgrade' ]]
	then
		upgraded=1
	elif [[ "${key}" == 'End-Date' ]]
	then
		if [[ ${upgraded} -eq 1 ]]
		then
			printf -v lastupgrade "%s" "${value}"
		fi
		upgraded=0
	fi
done < /var/log/apt/history.log

if [[ -v lastupgrade ]]
then
	tee /var/log/apt/lastupgrade <<-Here
	# Timestamp of last upgrade: ${lastupgrade}
	Here
	touch -d "${lastupgrade}" /var/log/apt/lastupgrade
fi

/etc/apt/apt.conf.d/90lastupgrade:

DPkg::Post-Invoke {"/usr/bin/systemd-run --on-active=60 /usr/sbin/apt-lastupgrade || /bin/true"};

Path of running shell script, dirname for locating config files, includes etc.

me_path="$(readlink -f "${0}")"
me_dir="$(dirname "${me_path}")"
me_base="$(basename "${me_path}")"

Debian /boot old kernel images

So I was looking at yet another failed apt-get upgrade because /boot was full.
After my initial whining on Twitter, I immediately received a hint towards /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/01autoremove-kernels, which gets generated from /etc/kernel/postinst.d/apt-auto-removal after the installation of new kernel images. The file contains a list of kernels that the package manager considers vital at this time. In theory, all kernels not covered by this list should be able to be autoremoved by running apt-get autoremove.
However it turns out that apt-get autoremove would not remove any kernels at all, at least not on this system. After a bit of peeking around on Stackexchange, it turns out that this still somewhat newish concept seems to be ridden by a few bugs, especially concerning kernels that are (Wrongfully? Rightfully? I just don’t know.) marked as manually-installed in the APT database: “Why doesn’t apt-get autoremove remove my old kernels?”
The solution, as suggested by an answer to the linked question, is to mark all kernel packages as autoinstalled before running apt-get autoremove:

apt-mark showmanual |
 grep -E "^linux-([[:alpha:]]+-)+[[:digit:].]+-[^-]+(|-.+)$" |
 xargs -n 1 apt-mark auto

I’m not an APT expert, but I’m posting this because the post-install hook that prevents the current kernel from being autoremoved makes the procedure appear “safe enough”. As always, reader discretion is advised. And there’s also the hope that it will get sorted out fully in the future.